Literature For Composition Essays Stories Poems

NOTE: Brief and Comprehensive Tables of Contents follow.

BRIEF CONTENTS   


I. THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT LITERATURE
1. How to Write an Effective Essay about Literature: A Crash Course
2. What is Critical Thinking about Literature? A Crash Course
3. The Writer as Reader
4. The Reader as Writer
5. The Pleasures of Reading, Writing and Thinking about Literature

II. WRITING ARGUMENTS ABOUT LITERATURE
6. Close Reading: Paraphrase, Summary, and Explication
7. Analysis: Inquiry, Interpretation and Argument
8. Pushing Analysis Further: Re-Interpreting and Revision
9. Comparison and Synthesis
10. Research: Writing with Sources

III. ANALYZING LITERARY FORMS AND ELEMENTS
11. Reading and Writing about Essays
12. Reading and Writing about Stories
13. Reading and Writing about Graphic Fiction
14. Reading and Writing about Plays
15. Reading and Writing about Poems

IV. ENJOYING LITERARY THEMES: A THEMATIC ANTHOLOGY
16. The World Around Us
17. Technology and Human Identity
18. Love and Hate, Men and Women
19. Innocence and Experience
20. All in a Day’s Work
21. American Dreams and Nightmares
22. Law and Disorder
23. Journeys

Appendix A: Writing About Literature: An Overview of Critical Strategies
Appendix B: Remarks about Manuscript Form
Literary Credits
Photo Credits
Index of Authors, Titles, and First Lines
Index of Terms


COMPREHENSIVE CONTENTS

Contents by Genre

Preface to Instructors

 I: THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT LITERATURE 

 1: How to Write an Effective Essay about Literature: A Crash Course      

The Basic Strategy  

Reading Closely: Approaching a First Draft

     Checklist: Generating Ideas for a Draft 

Writing and Revising: Achieving a Readable Draft

Checklist: Writing and Revising a Draft

Revising: Working with Peer Review

Preparing the Final Draft

 

 2: What is Critical Thinking about Literature?: A Crash Course 

The Basic Strategy 

What Is Critical Thinking? 

How Do We Engage in Critical Thinking?

Close Reading  

     Checklist: Close Reading 

Analysis:  Inquiry, Interpretation, Argument 

     Checklist:     Inquiry and Question-Asking 

     Checklist:  Interpretation 

     Checklist:  Argument 

Comparison and Synthesis 

     Checklist:  Comparison and Synthesis 

Revision and Self-Awareness 

Standing Back: Kinds of Writing 

Non-Analytic vs. Analytic Writing 

 

 3: The Writer as Reader                

Reading and Responding  

KATE CHOPIN • Ripe Figs  

Reading as Re-creation  

Reading for Understanding: Collecting Evidence and Making Reasonable Inferences  

Reading with Pen in Hand: Close Reading and Annotation 

 Sample Student Work: Annotation 

     Reading for Response: Recording First Reactions  

Sample Student Work: Response Writing 

     Reading for Inquiry: Ask Questions and Brainstorm Ideas 

Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes 

     Reading in Context: Identifying Your Audience and Purpose 

From Reading to Writing: Developing an Analytical Essay with an Argumentative Thesis 

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “Images of Ripening in Kate Chopin’s ‘Ripe Figs’”  

The Analytical Essay: Argument and Structure Analyzed  

The Writing Process: From First Responses to Final Essay 

Other Possibilities for Writing  

From Reading to Writing: Moving from Brainstorming to an Analytical Essay 

BRUCE HOLLAND ROGERS • Three Soldiers   

The Writing Process: From Response Writing to Final Essay   

Sample Student Work: Response Writing 

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “Thinking about Three Soldiers Thinking”  

The Analytical Essay: The Development of Ideas Analyzed  

From Reading to Writing: Moving from a Preliminary Outline to an Analytical Essay 

RAY BRADBURY • August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains  

The Writing Process: From Outlining to Final Essay  

Sample Student Work: Outlining

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “The Lesson of ‘August 2026’”  

 

Your Turn:  Additional Stories for Analysis  

MICHELE SERROS • Senior Picture Day  

HARUKI MURAKAMI • On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning 

JOHN UPDIKE  •  A & P 

 

 4: The Reader as Writer                

Developing Ideas through Close Reading and Inquiry 

     Getting Ideas   

Annotating a Text   

KATE CHOPIN • The Story of an Hour  

Brainstorming Ideas  

Focused Freewriting 

Sample Student Work: Freewriting 

Listing  

Sample Student Work: Listing 

Asking Questions  

Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes 

Keeping a Journal  

      Sample Student Work: Journal-writing 

Developing a Thesis through Critical Thinking

Arguing with Yourself 

Arguing a Thesis  

Checklist: Thesis Sentence  

From Reading to Writing to Revising: Drafting an Argument in an Analytical Essay

Sample Preliminary Draft of Student’s Analytical Essay: “Ironies in an Hour”

Revising an Argument  

Outlining an Argument  

Soliciting Peer Review, Thinking about Counterarguments  

From Reading to Writing to Revising: Finalizing an Analytical Essay 

Sample Final Draft of a Student’s Analytical Essay: “Ironies of Life in Kate Chopin’s ‘The Story of an Hour’”  

The Analytical Essay: The Final Draft Analyzed 

From Reading to Writing to Revising: Finalizing an Analytical Essay 

KATE CHOPIN • Désirée’s Baby  

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “Race and Identity in ‘Désirée’s Baby’”  

From Reading to Writing to Revising: Drafting a Comparison Essay 

KATE CHOPIN • The Storm  

Sample Student Work: Comparison Notes 

Sample Student Comparison Essay: “Two New Women”  

The Comparison Essay: Organization Analyzed   

Your Turn: Additional Stories for Analysis  

DAGOBERTO GILB Love in L.A. 

ELIZABETH TALLENT No One’s a Mystery  

JUNOT DIAZ    How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie 

T. CORAGHESSAN BOYLE • Greasy Lake   

MARY ANNE HOOD   How Far She Went 

 

 5:  The Pleasures of Reading, Writing and Thinking about    Literature    

The Pleasures of Literature 

ALLEN WOODMAN Wallet  

The Pleasures of Analyzing the Texts that Surround Us    

The Pleasures of Authoring Texts   

The Pleasures of Interacting with Texts   

Interacting with Fiction: Literature as Connection   

JAMAICA KINCAID • Girl  

Sample Student Personal Response Essay: “The Narrator in Jamaica Kincaid’s ‘Girl’: Questioning the Power of Voice” 

Interacting with Graphic Fiction: Literature as (Making and Breaking) Rules 

      LYNDA BARRY • Before You Write  

Interacting with Poetry: Literature as Language 

JULIA BIRD • 14: a txt msg pom.  

Interacting with Drama: Literature as Performance

       OSCAR WILDE• excerpt from The Importance of Being Ernest  

Interacting with Essays: Literature as Discovery 

ANNA LISA RAYA • It’s Hard Enough Being Me  

 

Your Turn:  Additional Stories, Poems, Plays and Essays for Pleasurable Analysis  

Poems

ALBERTO RIOS  •  Nani 

JIMMY SANTIAGO BACA  •  Green Chili 

HELEN CHASIN  •  The Word Plum 

WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS • This Is Just to Say 

GARY SOTO •  Oranges 

SARAH N. CLEGHORN • The Golf Links  

STEVIE SMITH  •  Not Waving but Drowning 

Stories

MARGARET ATWOOD •  Happy Endings 

AMBROSE BIERCE • An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge   

Play

MICHAEL GOLAMCO  • The Heartbreaker 

Essay

GEORGE SAUNDERS Commencement Speech on Kindness  

 

 II: WRITING ARGUMENTS ABOUT LITERATURE

 6  Close Reading: Paraphrase, Summary, and

                           Explication      

 

What Is Literature?  

Literature and Form  

Form and Meaning  

ROBERT FROST • The Span of Life  

Close Reading: Reading in Slow Motion  

Exploring a Poem and Its Meaning

      LANGSTON HUGHES • Harlem  

Paraphrase

   Sample Student Work: Paraphrase 

Summary 

   Sample Student Work: Summary 

Explication  

Working Toward an Explication

Sample Student Work: Annotation

Sample Student Work: Journal Entries

Sample Student Work: Listing

Sample Student Explication Essay: “Langston Hughes’s ‘Harlem’”  

Explication as Argument  

CATHY SONG • Stamp Collecting

Sample Student Argumentative Explication Essay: “Giving Stamps Personality in ‘Stamp Collecting’”

Checklist: Drafting an Explication

 

Your Turn:  Additional Poems for Explication  

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE  •  Sonnet 73

JOHN DONNE • Holy Sonnet XIV

EMILY BRONTË • Spellbound  

LI-YOUNG LEE • I Ask My Mother to Sing  

RANDALL JARRELL • The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner  

 

 7 Analysis: Inquiry, Interpretation and Argument       

Analysis  

Understanding Analysis as a Process of Inquiry, Interpretation, Argument

Analyzing a Story from the Hebrew Bible: The Judgment of Solomon  

The Judgment of Solomon  

Developing an Analysis of the Story  

Opening Up Additional Ways to Analyze the Story  

Analyzing a Story from the New Testament: The Parable of the Prodigal Son  

The Parable of the Prodigal Son  

Asking Questions that Trigger an Analysis of the Story 

From Inquiry to Interpretation to Argument: Developing an Analytical Paper  

ERNEST HEMINGWAY • Cat in the Rain

Close Reading

Sample Student Work: Annotations

Inquiry Questions  

  Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes

Interpretation Brainstorming

Sample Student Work: Journal Writing

     The Argument-Centered Paper

          Sample Student Argument Paper: “Hemingway’s American Wife”

      From Inquiry to an Analytical Paper: A Second Example

       Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes

    Sample Student Work: Journal Writing

JAMES JOYCE • Araby

    Sample Student Analytical Essay: “‘Araby’s’ Everyday and Imagined Setting”

From Inquiry to Interpretation to Argument: Maintaining an Interpretation in an Analytical Paper

    APHRA BEHN • Song: Love Armed  

   Maintaining Interpretive Interest

Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes

    Sample Student Work: Journal Writing

    Sample Student Essay: “The Double Nature of Love”   

Checklist: Editing a Draft  

 

Your Turn:  Additional Short Stories and Poems for Analysis  

EDGAR ALLAN POE • The Cask of Amontillado  

LESLIE MARMON SILKO • The Man to Send Rain Clouds  

BILLY COLLINS  •  Introduction to Poetry

ROBERT FROST • The Road Not Taken  

JOHN KEATS  •  Ode on a Grecian Urn

MARTIN ESPADA  •  Bully

 

 8  Pushing Analysis Further: Re-Interpreting and

                            Revision   

Interpretation and Meaning  

Is the Author’s Intention a Guide to Meaning?  

What Characterizes a Sound Interpretation?  

Interpreting Pat Mora’s “Immigrants”  

PAT MORA • Immigrants  

Checklist: Writing an Interpretation  

Strategy #1: Pushing Analysis by Rethinking First Responses

JEFFREY WHITMORE • Bedtime Story  

Sample Student Work: Response Writing Revisited

DOUGLAS L. HASKINS • Hide and Seek 

Sample Student Work: Response Writing Revisited

MARK PLANTS • Equal Rites  

Sample Student Work: Response Writing Revisited

Strategy #2: Pushing Analysis by Exploring Literary Form

LANGSTON HUGHES • Mother to Son

   Sample Student Work: Annotation Exploring Form

   Sample Student Work: Inquiry Notes Exploring Form

  Sample Student Analytical Essay: “Accepting the Challenge of a Difficult Climb in Langston Hughes’ ‘Mother to Son’”

Strategy #3: Pushing Analysis by Emphasizing Concepts and Insights

     ROBERT FROST • Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening  

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “Stopping by Woods–and Going On”  

Analyzing the Analytical Essay’s Development of a Conceptual Interpretation

Sample Student Analytical Essay: “ ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ as a Short Story”  

Strategy #4: Pushing Analysis Through Revision

          Revising for Ideas vs. Mechanics

          Revising Using Instructor Feedback, Peer Feedback, and Self-Critique

          Examining a Preliminary Draft with Revision in Mind

HA JIN •  Saboteur

            Sample Student Preliminary Draft of an Analytical Essay: “Individual and Social Morals in Ha 

                        Jin’s ‘Saboteur’”

         Developing a Revision Strategy: Thesis, Ideas, Evidence, Organization, Correctness

         Sample Student Final Draft of an Analytical Essay: “Individual and Social Morals in Ha 

                        Jin’s ‘Saboteur’”

 

Your Turn: Additional Poems and Stories for Interpretation  

T. S. ELIOT • The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock  

JOHN KEATS • Ode on a Grecian Urn  

THOMAS HARDY  •  The Man He Killed

ANNE BRADSTREET • Before the Birth of One of Her Children

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI • After Death

FRED CHAPELLE •  Narcissus and Echo

JOYCE CAROL OATES • Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?  

RAYMOND CARVER • Cathedral  

 

 

 9   Comparison and Synthesis  

Comparison and Critical Thinking

Organizing a Comparison Paper

Comparison and Close Reading

Comparison and Asking Questions

Comparison and Analyzing Evidence

     Sample Student Work: Comparison Arguments

Comparison and Arguing with Yourself

E. E. CUMMINGS • Buffalo Bill ’s  

     Checklist: Developing a Comparison

Synthesis Through Close Reading: Analyzing a Revised Short Story

RAYMOND CARVER • Mine  

RAYMOND CARVER • Little Things  

     Sample Student Writing: Innovative Listing

Synthesis Through Building a Concept Bridge: Connecting Two Poems

THYLIAS MOSS • Tornadoes

KWAME DAWES • Tornado Child

Sample Student Writing: Innovative Response Writing

Synthesis Using Theme

SANDRA CISNEROS •  Barbie-Q

MARYANNE O’HARA •Diverging Paths and All That

JAYNE ANNE PHILLIPS •  Sweethearts

Sample Student Writing:  Innovative Mapping

Synthesis Using Form

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE • Sonnet 18:Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?

HOWARD MOSS • Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day

Sample Student Comparison Essay: “A Comic Re-Writing of a Shakespeare Sonnet”

Checklist: Revising a Comparison

           

Your Turn:  Additional Poems and Stories for Comparison and Synthesis

Poetry

“Carpe diem” poems

ROBERT HERRICK • To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time  

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE • The Passionate Shepherd to His Love  

SIR WALTER RALEIGH • The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd  

ANDREW MARVELL • To His Coy Mistress  

JOHN DONNE • The Bait  

 

“blackberry” poems

GALWAY KINELL •Blackberry Eating

SYLVIA PLATH • Blackberrying

SEAMUS HEANEY •Blackeberry-Picking

YUSEF KOMUNYAKAA •Blackberries

 

“America” poems

WALT WHITMAN • I Hear America Singing

LANGSTON HUGHES •  I, Too [Sing America]

 

Stories

Stories about reading and writing

JULIO CORTAZAR •  Continuity of Parks

A.M. HOMES • Things You Should Know

 

Stories about grandmothers

LAN SAMANTHA CHANG •  Water Names

KATHERINE ANNE PORTER • The Jilting of Granny Weatherall  

 

 10:  Research: Writing with Sources      

Creating a Research Plan

     Enter Research with a Plan of Action

     What Does Your Own Institution Offer?

     Plan the Type of Research You Want to Do

Selecting a Research Topic and Generating Research Questions

     Use Close Reading as Your Starting Point

     Select Your Topic

     Skim Resources Through Preliminary Research

     Narrow Your Topic and Form a Working Thesis

     Sample Student Work: Digital Research Folder Assignment and Research Plan Notes

     Sample Student Work: Digital Research Folder “Working Thesis” Notes

     Generate Key Concepts as Keywords

     Create Inquiry Questions

     Sample Student Work: Digital Research Folder “Research Keywords” and “Inquiry Questions” Notes

Locating Materials Through Productive Searches

Generate Meaningful Keywords

Checklist:  Creating Meaningful Keywords for a Successful Search

Using Academic Databases to Locate Materials

     Search Full-Text Academic Databases

     Search the MLA Database

     Perform Advanced Keyword Searches

Sample Student Work: Searching the Academic Database

Using the Library Catalog to Locate Materials

        Locate Books and Additional Resources

        Sample Student Work: Searching the Library Catalog

Using the Internet to Perform Meaningful Research

       Sample Student Work: Searching the Internet

Evaluating Sources for Academic Quality

       Checklist: Evaluating Web Sites for Quality

     Sample Student Work: Evaluating Sources for Academic Quality

Evaluate Sources for Topic “Fit”

     Checklist: Evaluating Sources for Topic “Fit”

     Sample Student Work: Evaluating Sources for Topic “Fit”

Taking Notes on Secondary Sources

     A Guide to Note-Taking

     Sample Student Work: Annotation of Research Sources

     Sample Student Work: Digital Research Folder Critical Thinking Notes

Drafting the Paper

Focus on Primary Sources

Integrate Secondary Sources  

Create a Relationship Between Your Writing and the Source

Surround the Source with Your Writing

Agree with a Source in Order to Develop Your Ideas

Sample Student Work: Source Integration

Avoiding Plagiarism  

Sample Student Research Essay: “Dickinson’s Representation of Changing Seasons and Changing Emotions”

 III: ANALYZING LITERARY FORMS AND ELEMENTS    

 11: Reading and Writing about Essays   

Types of Essays  

Elements of Essays

The Essayist’s Persona  

Voice  

Tone  

Topic and Thesis  

BRENT STAPLES • Black Men and Public Space

Checklist: Getting Ideas for Writing about Essays  

Student Writing Portfolio (summary paper): Brent Staples “Black Men and

Public Space”

Your Turn: Additional Essays for Analysis  

LANGSTON HUGHES • Salvation  

LAURA VANDERKAM • Hookups Starve the Soul  

STEVEN DOLOFF • The Opposite Sex  

GRETEL EHRLICH • About Men  

 

 12: Reading and Writing about Stories   

Stories True and False  

GRACE PALEY • Samuel  

Elements of Fiction  

Character  

Plot

Foreshadowing  

Setting and Atmosphere  

Symbolism  

Narrative Point of View  

Style and Point of View  

Theme  

WILLIAM FAULKNER • A Rose for Emily  

Checklist: Getting Ideas for Writing about Stories  

Student Writing Portfolio (analysis paper):  William Faulkner “A Rose for

Emily”  

 

Your Turn: Additional Stories for Analysis  

KATHERINE MANSFIELD   •  Miss Brill

TIM O’BRIEN • The Things They Carried  

Gabriel García Márquez • A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings: A Tale for Children  

An Author In Depth:  Flannery O’Connor

FLANNERY O’CONNOR • A Good Man Is Hard to Find  

Remarks from Essays and Letters  

From “The Fiction Writer and His Country”  

From “Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction”  

From “The Nature and Aim of Fiction”  

From “Writing Short Stories”  

On Interpreting “A Good Man Is Hard to Find”  

     “A Reasonable Use of the Unreasonable”  

 

 

 13: Reading and Writing about Graphic Fiction     

Letters and Pictures, Words and Images

GRANT WOOD • Death on the Ridge Road  

Reading an Image: A Short Story Told in One Panel  

TONY CARRILLO • F Minus  

Elements of Graphic Fiction

     Visual Elements

     Narrative and Graphic Jumps

     Graphic Style

Reading a Series of Images: A Story Told in Sequential Panels  

ART SPIEGELMAN • Nature vs. Nurture  

Checklist: Getting Ideas for Writing Arguments about Graphic Fiction

Your Turn: Additional Graphic Fiction for Analysis

WILL EISNER • Hamlet on a Rooftop  

An Example of a Graphic Adaptation

R. CRUMB and DAVID ZANE MAIROWITZ • A Hunger Artist  

 

 14:  Reading and Writing about Plays    

Types of Plays  

Tragedy  

Comedy  

Elements of Drama  

Theme  

Plot  

Gestures  

Setting  

Characterization and Motivation  

Checklist: Getting Ideas for Writing Arguments about Plays  

Thinking about a Filmed Version of a Play  

Getting Ready to Write about a Filmed Play

Checklist: Writing about a Filmed Play  

Student Writing Portfolio (comparison paper): Susan Glaspell “Trifles” and “A Jury of Her Peers”

Susan Glaspell • Trifles  

Susan Glaspell • A Jury of Her Peers (short story version of play)  

 

Your Turn: Additional Plays for Analysis

A Modern Comedy  

DAVID IVES • Sure Thing  

A Note on Greek Tragedy

Sophocles • Antigone

 

An Author In Depth:  WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

A Note on the Elizabethan Theater  

A Note on Hamlet on the Stage  

A Note on the Text of Hamlet  

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE • The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark  

ANNE BARTON • The Promulgation of Confusion  

STANLEY WELLS • On the First Soliloquy  

ELAINE SHOWALTER • Representing Ophelia  

BERNICE W. KLIMAN • The BBC Hamlet: A Television Production  

WILL SARETTA • Branagh’s Film of Hamlet  

 

 15: Reading and Writing about Poems   

Elements of Poetry  

The Speaker and the Poet  

EMILY DICKINSON • I’m Nobody! Who are you?  

EMILY DICKINSON • Wild Nights–Wild Nights  

The Language of Poetry: Diction and Tone  

     WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE • Sonnet 146  

     Figurative Language

     WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE • Sonnet 130

     Imagery and Symbolism

     EDMUND WALLER • Song (Go, lovely rose)

     WILLIAM BLAKE • The Sick Rose    

     Verbal Irony and Paradox

     Structure

Rhythm and Versification: A Glossary for Reference

     Meter

     Patterns of Sound

     Stanzaic Patterns

     BILLY COLLINS • Sonnet

      Blank Verse and Free Verse  

     Checklist: Getting Ideas for Writing Arguments about Poems

Student Writing Portfolio (explication paper): Gwendolyn Brooks “kitchenette building”

    GWENDOLYN BROOKS  •  kitchenette building

 

Your Turn: Additional Poems for Analysis

ROBERT BROWNING • My Last Duchess  

E. E. CUMMINGS • anyone lived in a pretty how town  

SYLVIA PLATH • Daddy  

GWENDOLYN BROOKS • We Real Cool  

ETHERIDGE KNIGHT • For Malcolm, a Year After  

ANNE SEXTON • Her Kind  

JAMES WRIGHT • Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota  

An Author in Depth: Robert Frost  

Robert Frost on Poetry: The Figure a Poem Makes

ROBERT FROST • The Pasture  

ROBERT FROST • Mowing  

ROBERT FROST • The Wood-Pile  

ROBERT FROST • The Oven Bird  

ROBERT FROST • The Need of Being Versed in Country Things  

ROBERT FROST • The Most of It  

ROBERT FROST • Design  

PART IV: ENJOYING LITERARY THEMES: A THEMATIC ANTHOLOGY

 

 16: The World around Us              

Essays  

HENRY DAVID THOREAU   •   From Walden

BILL McKIBBEN • Now or Never  

Stories  

AESOP • The Ant and the Grasshopper  

AESOP • The North Wind and the Sun  

JACK LONDON • To Build a Fire  

SARAH ORNE JEWETT • A White Heron  

PATRICIA GRACE • Butterflies  

Poems  

MATTHEW ARNOLD • In Harmony with Nature 

THOMAS HARDY • Transformations 

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS • God’s Grandeur  

WALT WHITMAN • A Noiseless Patient Spider  

EMILY DICKINSON • A Narrow Fellow in the Grass  

EMILY DICKINSON • There’s a certain Slant of light

EMILY DICKINSON  • The name–of it–is “Autumn”

JOY HARJO • Vision  

MARY OLIVER • The Black Walnut Tree  

KAY RYAN • Turtle  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

     

 

 17:  Technology and Human Identity

Essay

NICHOLAS CARR •  Is Google Making Us Stupid?

 

Stories

KURT VONNEGUT JR. • Harrison Bergeron  

AMY STERLING CASIL • Perfect Stranger  

MARK TWAIN • A Telephonic Conversation

DOROTHY PARKER  • A Telephone Call

MARIA SEMPLE • Dear Mountain Room Parents

ROBIN HEMLEY  •  Reply All

JOHN CHEEVER  •  The Enormous Radio

RAY BRADBURY  •  The Veldt

STEPHEN KING  •  Word Processor of the Gods

KIT REED  •  The New You

Poems

     WALT WHITMAN To a Locomotive in Winter (from Leaves of Grass)

     EMILY DICKINSON  •  I Like to see it lap the Miles

     LISEL MUELLER The End of Science Fiction

     DANIEL NYIKOS Potato Soup

     A. E. STALLINGS  Sestina: Like

     PHILIP NIKOLAYEV Dodging 1985

     MARCUS WICKER Ode to Browsing the Web

Play

LUIS VALDEZ • Los Vendidos  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

 

 18:  Love and Hate, Men and Women

Essay  

JUDITH ORTIZ COFER • I Fell in Love, or My Hormones Awakened  

Stories  

ZORA NEALE HURSTON • Sweat  

JHUMPA LAHIRI, This Blessed House

Poems  

ANONYMOUS • Western Wind  

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE • Sonnet 116 (Let me not to the marriage of true minds)  

JOHN DONNE • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning  

EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY • Love Is Not All: It Is Not Meat nor Drink  

ROBERT BROWNING, Porphyria’s Lover

NIKKI GIOVANNI • Love in Place  

ANONYMOUS  •  Higamus, Hogamus

DOROTHY PARKER • General Review of the Sex Situation  

FRANK O’HARA • Homosexuality  

MARGE PIERCY • Barbie Doll  

Play  

TERRENCE McNALLY • Andre’s Mother  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

 

 19: Innocence and Experience          

Essay  

GEORGE ORWELL • Shooting an Elephant  

Stories  

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN • The Emperor’s New Clothes  

CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN • The Yellow Wallpaper  

JOHN STEINBECK • The Chrysanthemums  

ALICE WALKER • Everyday Use  

 

Poems  

WILLIAM BLAKE • Infant Joy  

WILLIAM BLAKE • Infant Sorrow  

WILLIAM BLAKE • The Echoing Green  

WILLIAM BLAKE • The Lamb  

WILLIAM BLAKE • The Tyger  

THOMAS HARDY, The Ruined Maid

E. E. CUMMINGS • in Just-  

LOUISE GLÜCK • The School Children  

LINDA PASTAN • Ethics  

THEODORE ROETHKE • My Papa’s Waltz  

SHARON OLDS • Rites of Passage  

NATASHA TRETHEWEY   •  White Lies

 

 

 20: All in a Day’s Work                  

Essay  

Barbara Ehrenreich • Wal-Mart Orientation Program  

Stories  

Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm • Mother Holle  

WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS • The Use of Force  

Will Eisner • The Day I Became a Professional  

Daniel Orozco • Orientation  

Lorrie Moore • How to Become a Writer 

Poems  

William Wordsworth • The Solitary Reaper 

Carl Sandburg • Chicago  

Gary Snyder • Hay for the Horses  

Robert Hayden • Those Winter Sundays  

Seamus Heaney • Digging  

JULIA ALVAREZ • Woman’s Work  

Marge Piercy • To be of use  

JIMMY SANTIAGO BACA • So Mexicans Are Taking Jobs from Americans  

Plays  

Jane Martin • Rodeo  

Arthur Miller • Death of a Salesman  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

 

 21: American Dreams and Nightmares    

Essays  

CHIEF SEATTLE • My People 

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON • Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions  

ABRAHAM LINCOLN • Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery  

STUDS TERKEL • Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Dream  

ANDREW LAM • Who Will Light Incense When Mother’s Gone?  

Stories  

SHERMAN ALEXIE • The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven  

RALPH ELLISON • Battle Royal  

TONI CADE BAMBARA • The Lesson 

AMY TAN • Two Kinds 

Poems  

ROBERT HAYDEN • Frederick Douglass  

LORNA DEE CERVANTES • Refugee Ship  

EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON • Richard Cory  

W. H. AUDEN • The Unknown Citizen  

EMMA LAZARUS • The New Colossus  

THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH • The Unguarded Gates 

JOSEPH BRUCHAC III • Ellis Island  

AURORA LEVINS MORALES • Child of the Americas  

GLORIA ANZALDÚA • To Live in the Borderlands Means You  

MITSUYE YAMADA • To the Lady 

NILA NORTHSUN • Moving Camp Too Far  

YUSEF KOMUNYAKAA • Facing It  

BILLY COLLINS • The Names  

Play

LORRAINE HANSBERRY • A Raisin in the Sun  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

 

 22: Law and Disorder                    

Essay 

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. •  Letter from Birmingham Jail  

Stories  

ELIZABETH BISHOP • The Hanging of the Mouse  

URSULA K. LE GUIN • The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas 

SHIRLEY JACKSON • The Lottery  

WILLIAM FAULKNER • Barn Burning  

TOBIAS WOLFF • Powder  

Poems  

ANONYMOUS • Birmingham Jail  

A. E. HOUSMAN • The Carpenter’s Son  

A. E. HOUSMAN • Oh who is that young sinner  

DOROTHY PARKER • Résumé  

CLAUDE McKAY • If We Must Die  

JIMMY SANTIAGO BACA • Cloudy Day  

CAROLYN FORCHÉ • The Colonel  

HAKI MADHUBUTI, The B Network

JILL McDONOUGH, Three a.m.

Plays  

BILLY GODA • No Crime  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward 

 

 23:  Journeys                                

Essays  

JOAN DIDION • On Going Home  

MONTESQUIEU • Persian Letters  

Stories  

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE • Young Goodman Brown  

EUDORA WELTY • A Worn Path  

AMY HEMPEL • Today Will Be a Quiet Day  

JAMES JOYCE • Eveline 

Poems  

JOHN KEATS • On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer 

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY • Ozymandias  

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON • Ulysses  

COUNTEE CULLEN •  Incident  

WILLIAM STAFFORD • Traveling through the Dark  

DEREK WALCOTT • A Far Cry from Africa  

SHERMAN ALEXIE • On the Amtrak from Boston to New York City  

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS • Sailing to Byzantium  

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI • Uphill  

A Note on Spirituals 

Anonymous • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot  

Anonymous • Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel  

Play

HENRIK IBSEN • A Doll’s House  

Chapter Overview: Looking Backward/Looking Forward  

 

APPENDIX A: Writing about Literature: An Overview of Critical Strategies       

Please review the FAQs and contact us if you find a problem.

Credits: 1

Prerequisite: Though not necessary to have it completed, English – 8directly proceeds this one in the progression. English 8 can be used as a high school course.

Recommended: 9th or 10th grade

Test Prep: Analyzing and Interpreting Literature CLEP

Course Description: Students will focus this year on analyzing literature including poetry, short stories, novels, and plays. Students will develop their understanding of literary devices and terminology to be able to express researched critiques of literature. Students will produce a number of literary analysis papers as well as other essays. Additionally, students will be engaged creatively in writing short stories and poetry. Students will use the complete writing process and submit work for peer editing. Students will also read a variety of nonfiction and will be expected to produce a newspaper, newsletter and podcast as part of their nonfiction studies. To improve in their writing, students will study spelling, vocabulary, grammar, suspense, irony, metaphor, theme, mood and foreshadowing. Students will take a final exam at the end of the course.

Reading List

novels: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Twain; Emma, Austen; Watership Down, Adams

plays: Antigone, Sophocles; Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare

short stories: The Machine that Won the War, Asimov; The Story of an Hour, Chopin; The Interlopers, Saki; Two Kinds, Tan; Lamb to the Slaughter, Dahl; The Hunger Artist, Kafka

nonfiction: speeches, news articles from The New York Times, The Washington Times and World magazine; excerpts from each of the following: African Game Trails, Roosevelt; The Way to Rainy Mountain, Momaday; A Thousand Miles Up the Nile, Edwards

Day 1

If a link is not working, follow the steps on the FAQ page.

Vocabulary(*)

  1. (*)Print out the first quarter or use the Excel version.
  2. Learn your vocabulary for the week. Click the flashcards and make sure you know the words.

Reading

  1. Let’s ease into the year with some poems.
  2. Explain to someone what he’s feeling in the beginning of the poem and what he decides by the end. What mental shift does he make?
  3. What is he talking about? How do desire and hate play into this poem?

Writing

  1. For review:
  2. Read through the list of terms related to MLA format. You can quiz yourself on the words here.

Day 2

Vocabulary

  1. Study your vocabulary. Make sure you know the words.

Reading

  1. Listen to former president Bill Clinton talk about his favorite poem and read it, the Concord Hymn.
  2. He describes the reason it was written. What lines from the poem show its purpose? (answers: just a couple examples “shot heard round the world” “votive stone”)
  3. A Psalm of Life, listen to the pastor speak about and read the poem.
  4. He tells of a line that struck him the first time he heard it. What was the line? What does it mean to you in your life?

Writing

  1. Look through the example of using MLA format.
  2. Learn briefly about citing sources. You need to know what you need to do, but you can always look up again how to do it when you need it.
  3. If you want to bookmark this, here’s a list of writing resources including the most up-to-date MLA format guide.

Day 3

Vocabulary

  1. Click on flashcards and make sure you know the words.

Reading

  1. What book of the Bible does this poem remind you of?  (hint: one of Solomon’s)
  2. This is a fun poem. What literary device is used in the last line.  (hint: look from f to i)

Writing

  1. What is plagiarism? You cite sources to avoid plagiarism.
  2. Take the quiz and record your score.

Day 4

Vocabulary

  1. Make sure you know the words.

Reading

  1. Are you a nobody too?
  2. This poem is advice/inspirational pep talk for his son.
  3. What’s the name of the poem and who is the author?
  4. What else have you read that he’s written?
  5. Why are triumph and disaster “impostors?”

Writing(*)

  1. Read about evaluating online sources for credibility.
  2. Take the quiz and record your score.
  3. (*) You might want this website evaluation rubric printed out. Either way, you will refer to it as you do online research.

Day 5

Vocabulary

  1. Choose the test for each set of words: one, two.
  2. After your quiz you can review your wrong answers.
  3. Record your score out of 10. (how many you got right–there are five in each set)

Writing

  1. You will be reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. If you have already read it and really don’t want to read it again, you can choose another. But it’s okay to read it again because this time you are going to be looking at it from a literary analysis perspective.
    • Some other book choices are The Joy Luck Club and Across Five Aprils.
    • You will be reading throughout the course and later will be writing a research paper on a theme in the book you choose.
  2. Learn about literary analysis and developing a thesis.
  3. Before you begin your actual paper, you will need to develop a thesis statement. You will not be able to write your thesis until you have read some or your entire novel. First, read through the following website, Writing About Fiction: Developing a Thesis.
  4. Take the quiz and record your score.

Reading

  1. If you want to download Tom Sawyer, here is the link.
  2. Here is an audio version if you are interested.
  3. Read about The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Day 6(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Write down the first half of the words with their definitions

Writing(*)

  1. Read the requirements and tips for your research paper.
  2. What do you need to be doing while you read?  (hint: page 8)
  3. You might want to have the grading rubric for your paper printed out and on hand to look at to remind yourself of what you need to do to get the best grade.

Reading

  1. Start reading your novel. You will read a chapter a day.
  2. Here’s the audio link.  (This link is Chapters 1 and 2.  You are only doing Chapter 1 today.)
  3. Describe Tom.
  4. He starts out the novel very immature. He thinks the world should revolve around him. He’s very selfish. He doesn’t think of others and doesn’t care about what others are feeling. He’s obviously not one to admire or emulate, as none of you want to be immature. He’ll do some growing up before the novel is done.
  5. What do these verses say about Tom?  Proverbs 12:1Proverbs 10:17   (answer: He’s foolish and not someone you should be friends with.)

Day 7

Vocabulary

  1. Write down the second half of the words with their definitions that you don’t have yet and review the ones you saw before.

Writing

  1. Make sure you know the words and definitions related to MLA format. You can quiz yourself on the words here.

Reading

  1. Chapter 2
  2. Here’s the audio link.  (This link is Chapters 1 and 2.  Start where Chapter 1 ended.)

Day 8

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing/Grammar

  1. Learn about sentence fragments.
  2. Find the fragments. If you get one wrong, READ the explanation. Learn from your mistake and then your mistake becomes a positive thing.
  3. Learn about run on sentences.
  4. Fix the run on sentences.
  5. Take the quiz. Write down your answers before you click to check them. Record your score.  (ANSWER CORRECTION:  #9 answer is B)

Reading

  1. Chapter 3
  2. Here’s the audio link.  (This is for Chapters 3 and 4.  Write down where Chapter 3 ends today.)
  3. Here’s an example of irony. Aunt Polly thinks he did a great job but threatens him anyway. Tom tells his Aunt Polly that he completed his chores. She is so surprised by how great a job was done that she says, “Well, go ‘long and play; but mind you get back some time in a week, or I’ll tan you.  (I want to say thanks to Rebecca Wire for reading Tom Sawyer and making comments for me to share with the students.)

Day 9(*)

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Complete the word search.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing(*)

  1. Read the list of poetic terminology.
  2. You can use the list to help you complete this crossword puzzle.
  3. Read The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost.
  4. What is the rhyme scheme? What figurative language or poetic devices are used? What literary elements can you find? (This is more than you have just learned. Use what you know.)
  5. Check the answers when you are ready.
  6. (*) Here is a nice reference for poetic devices.

Reading

  1. Chapter 4
  2. Here’s the audio link.  (This is for Chapters 3 and 4.)

Day 10

Vocabulary

  1. Take the practice quiz.
  2. Record your score out of 20 (two points per question). Use your definition list to check your worksheet answers.

Writing

  1. Read the poems. Now reread them with commentary and analysis.
  2. Do you remember what “theme” means?  What would be the theme of the poems you just read?  The common theme in those poems is SCHOOL.
  3. Do this quiz.

Reading

  1. Chapter 5
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 5 and 6.
  3. What do you know so far about the protagonist/antagonist?
  4. What main plot points have passed?

Day 11

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Writing

  1. Read the imitating poetic devices assignment.
  2. Follow the directions.
  3. Score your poem according to the rubric.
  4. Divide your score by 4 (drop off the decimals) and record that new number.

Reading

  1. Chapter 6
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 5 and 6.
  3. This book was published in 1876. You will come across prejudice that was common then. It was normal to use the “N” word. It is never okay to call an African American a “Ni…r” as they do in this book. Then it was just the common word, but it wasn’t a respectful word.
  4. There is a character in the book named Injun Joe. He’s a Native American. They consider him bad because he’s an Injun, an Indian. In chapter 9 he even describes himself this way, “The Injun blood ain’t in me for nothing,” as if his blood, his ethnicity caused him to act in such a bad way. He’s bought into the stereotype and is fulfilling it.
  5. Are you aware of how you stereotype others? When do you do it? Are there stereotypes that you fall into just because it’s expected of you?

Day 12

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Writing

  1. Review fragments and run ons.
  2. Try some more practice.

Reading

  1. Huckleberry Finn is “cordially hated and dreaded by all the mothers of the town”, but he is seen as a hero by the children. What is that an example of?  (answer: irony, It’s the opposite.)
  2. What do you know about Huck and his dad? People see Huck as a bad kid, but remember that there is always a back story. Everybody has a story.
  3. Chapter 7
  4. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 7 and 8.

Day 13

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Writing

  1. Do you know your poetic devices?  (You may not have learned all of these in this lesson, but you have seen them all if you have taken seventh and eighth EP English courses.)

Reading

  1. Chapter 8
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 7 and 8.
  3. In this chapter we read some foreshadowing. Tom thinks about wanting to become a pirate after he fights with Becky. This is foreshadowing his later travels to Jackson’s Island.

Day 14

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week. Can you spell them?

Writing

  1. For the next three days you will be completing the analyzing poetry project.
  2. You choose a poet and analyze three poems, creating a presentation about the poet and the chosen works.
  3. Make sure you follow the directions. Read over the grading rubric to make sure you do what it takes to get a perfect score.
  4. You may ask a parent if you have a different idea for the form of your project: a movie, a poster, etc.

Reading

  1. Chapter 9
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 9 and 10.
  3. Here are some more notes from the book. Before Huck and Tom go to the graveyard, Tom hears a ticking clock. It is described as a “deathwatch” and it terrifies him.  Then Mr. Robinson dies, so the foreshadowing was for the murder in the graveyard.

  4. How does suspense build in this chapter?

Day 15

Vocabulary

  1. Take your vocabulary test.
  2. Record your score out of ten.

Writing

  1. Continue your work on your analyzing poetry project.
  2. Make sure you are following all the directions and aiming for a perfect score.
  3. You need to finish on Day 16.

Reading

  1. Chapter 10
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 9 and 10.
  3. We see superstition again in this chapter. What does this verse have to say about it?

Day 16

Vocabulary

  1. Write down the first half of the words with their definitions

Writing

  1. Finish and present your final poetry project.
  2. Use the grading rubric to score your project.
  3. Record your score.

Reading

  1. Chapter 11
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 11 and 12.
  3. Read about symbolism.

Day 17

Vocabulary

  1. Write down the second half of the words with their definitions

Writing

  1. Look at your literary analysis assignment again.
  2. You should have a topic in mind or at least have it narrowed down. Make sure you are taking notes with page references and quotes that support your topic and, if you have it planned, your thesis.

Reading

  1. Chapter 12
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 11 and 12.

Day 18

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. Read about the passive voice. Don’t do the quiz.

Reading

  1. Chapter 13
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 13, 14, and 15.

Day 19

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Complete the wordsearch.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. Read this page on the passive voice.
  2. Write five sentences in the passive voice and then rewrite them without it.

Reading

  1. Chapter 14
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 13, 14, and 15.

Day 20

Vocabulary

  1. Take the practice quiz.
  2. Record your score out of 20 (two points per question).

Writing

  1. Try the exercise. Type your answers before you check!

Reading

  1. Chapter 15
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 13, 14, and 15.
  3. Read about archetypes in literature.

Day 21

Vocabulary

  1. Read through your words for the week.

Writing

  1. Read about active voice one more time.
  2. Try the activity on active and passive voice.

Reading

  1. Chapter 16
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 16 and 17.
  3. Tom and his friends try smoking. What makes this a thousand times more stupid to do today? (answer: Today we know how bad it is for you and how addicting it is.)

Day 22

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Writing

  1. Hopefully this short story sequence depiction looks a little familiar.
  2. Read the list of writing terminology. Some are ones you’ve seen before, but there is new terminology for your short story unit.
  3. At the top of the page choose flash cards or a game like Scatter to practice the terms.

Reading

  1. Chapter 17
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 16 and 17.

Day 23

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Writing*

  1. *Print out and complete the first two columns of this chart on the types of irony.
  2. Here is more information on the three types of irony.
  3. Here is a page on foreshadowing.
  4. You are going to be reading short stories and looking for examples of these things while you read.

Reading*

  1. *Print out and complete this foreshadowing chart as you read. (You won’t have page numbers.)
  2. You will also fill in your irony chart as you read.
  3. Today’s story is The Machine that Won the War.
  4. Find what examples you can to fill in your chart. (There are two more stories that you will read.)
  5. What is the external conflict?
  6. What about the story creates suspense?
  7. Chapter 18
  8. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 18, 19, and 20.

Day 24

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words for the week.

Reading

  1. Read this analysis of The Machine that Won the War.
  2. Today you will read “The Story of an Hour.”
  3. Continue to fill in your irony and foreshadowing charts as you read.
  4. What would you say is the theme of this story?
  5. Chapter 19
  6. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 18, 19, and 20.

Writing

  1. How could you add dramatic irony to the story? Rewrite part of the story to add it in.

Day 25

Vocabulary

  1. Take your vocabulary test.
  2. Record your score out of ten.

Reading

  1. Read these analyses of “The Story of an Hour.”
    1. literary critique
    2. irony, foreshadowing
    3. theme
  2. Chapter 20
  3. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 18, 19, and 20.
  4. In this chapter Tom takes Becky’s punishment. What does that say about Tom? (Think about how he used to react to punishment from Aunt Polly.)
  5. Has he matured at all?

Day 26

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the first half of the words and their definitions.

Reading

  1. Read the short story, The Interlopers. Read all of the introductory material. You don’t have to print it out and answer all of the questions in writing, but stop to think about the answers as you go.
  2. What is the external conflict?
  3. What builds suspense?
  4. Where is there foreshadowing and irony in the story? (add it to your charts)
  5. Chapter 21
  6. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 21, 22, and 23.

Writing

  1. Rewrite the ending. (One example: What would have happened if they had had cell phones?)

Day 27

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the second half of the words and their defintions. You can also review what you have already seen. You can use iwords to check to make sure you have them all.

Reading

  1. Scroll down to read other students’ comments on the story.
  2. Make sure your charts are filled in.
  3. Give yourself 5 points for each completed chart.
  4. Chapter 22
  5. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 21, 22, and 23.

Writing

  1. Write short examples of each type of irony. (You don’t have to write out the story, just, “The main character thinks that…but.”
  2. Record 3 points for each: 1 point for identifying the type of irony and 2 points for the example. Total: 9

Day 28

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.
  2. Look over your words.

Reading

  1. Chapter 23
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 21, 22, and 23.
  3. In Tom Sawyer, what foreshadowing, suspense and irony have you noticed?

Day 29

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Complete the wordsearch.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. You are going to write a compare and contrast essay about two of the short stories you read.
  2. Today, read about writing a compare and contrast essay.

Reading

  1. Chapter 24
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 24 and 25.
  3. How does suspense build in this chapter?

Day 30*

Vocabulary

  1. Take the practice quiz.
  2. Record your score.

Writing*

  1. Read the rubric that you will be used to grade your essay. (The last column is cut off. That column would be a score of 1 for “meets little/no expectations.”)
  2. Review these strategies for planning the structure of your essay.
  3. *Use this Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the two stories you’ve chosen.

Reading

  1. Chapter 25
  2. Here is the audio link.  This is for Chapters 24 and 25.
  3. Below are some ideas for the paper you are going to write on Tom Sawyer. Be thinking about a topic and what examples you could use from the book.
    • Compare and contrast two characters
    • Discuss a running theme throughout the novel
    • Discuss symbolism/imagery within the novel
    • Discuss how suspense, irony, or foreshadowing play a part in the novel
    • Connections to history to the novel  (from GVL)

Day 31

Vocabulary

  1. Review your lesson 1 and lesson 2 vocabulary.

Writing

  1. Create an outline for your short stories compare and contrast essay. You should have written out your thesis statement and a topic sentence for each paragraph. You should also have quotes and examples for each point.
  2. Remember, you will need at least five paragraphs: an introduction which ends with your thesis, three points that fit your thesis, and a conclusion that restates your thesis and wraps up, leaving us satisfied 🙂

Reading

  1. Chapter 26
  2. Here is the audio link.

Day 32

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.

Writing

  1. Work on writing your essay.
  2. On Day 33 you will finish writing it.

Reading

  1. Chapter 27
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 27 and 28.

Day 33

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Do a word search.

Writing

  1. Try to finish writing your first draft of your essay.

Reading

  1. Chapter 28
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 27 and 28.

Day 34

Vocabulary

  1. Play a game with your vocabulary.

Writing

  1. Read the rubric that will be used to grade your essay.
  2. Read your essay out loud. Mark anything that makes you stumble or sounds off.
  3. You can also try this online proofreader.
  4. Edit your essay according to how it will be graded. Your goal is to get a perfect score.
  5. On Day 35 you need to finish your essay for grading.

Reading

  1. Chapter 29
  2. Here’s the audio link.

Day 35 

Vocabulary

  1. If you got 100% on all of your vocab quizzes, then you have no vocabulary assignment today. Congratulations!
  2. Look over your words.
  3. You can take a new quiz from the first three units on this page. Choose 1, 2, or 3 from the left side bar. Choose Test Your Vocabulary. Take a point off of 20 for any you get wrong.
  4. You can replace your previous score with this score if it is improved.

Writing

  1. Reread your essay and continue to edit it.
  2. Score your essay using the rubric. Record your score out of 25. (If you use the pdf, DON’T multiply by four.)
  3. Read someone else’s waiting compare and contrast essay from peer editing  and offer feedback according to the directions. Email it to them, not me.
  4. When you are happy, submit it for the peer editing page by emailing me at my gmail address, allinonehomeschool.  Tell me your Literature and Composition Day 35 and which essay that you left feedback for. Please take your last name off of your paper and include an email address for someone to respond to.
    • Export/save as/convert your document to a PDF and send it in that format.
  5. Editing other writing will help your writing. Don’t skip this.
  6. If you don’t hear back from someone within a few weeks, then ask someone you know to do it for you. Give them the grading rubric. Ask them for SPECIFIC feedback and a score out of 25. Record the score unless you truly think it’s not fair (with parental permission).
  7. Fix up your essay based on the feedback. Re-score your essay (rubric) and record your score out of 100. (This time multiply.)

Reading

  1. Chapter 30
  2. Here’s the audio link.

Day 36

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the first half of the words and defintions.

Writing

  1. Take the matching quiz. Write your letter answers down and then click on the key picture to check.
  2. If you didn’t take English 8, you will have to guess at some, but some you should be able to figure out. It doesn’t count against you if you don’t know.
  3. Record your score. (all extra credit points)
  4. If you have not left feedback for an essay on the peer edit page, complete that today.

Reading

  1. Chapter 31
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 31 and 32.

Day 37

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to finish writing down all the words for unit 4.

Writing

  1. You are going to write a short story.
  2. It doesn’t have to be long 🙂 Think of how short The Story of an Hour was.
  3. Think about the diagram of a story, parts of a story.
  4. Include irony, foreshadowing and suspense.
  5. Look over the grading rubric so you know what you are aiming for.
  6. Work on writing today. You will be editing on Day 40.

Reading

  1. Chapter 32
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 31 and 32.

Day 38

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. Work on writing

Reading

  1. Chapter 33
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 33, 34, and 35.

Day 39

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Complete the word search.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. Finish writing your story. (You can work  on editing still.)

Reading

  1. Chapter 34
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 33, 34, and 35.

Day 40

Vocabulary

  1. Take the practice quiz .
  2. Record your score out of 20 (two points per question).

Writing

  1. Work on editing your piece and create a final draft.
  2. Score your story using the grading rubric. Multiply your score by 4. Your score will be out of 80. Record your score.
  3. (I earlier had this as a peer editing assignment. If your grading sheet lists a feedback grade, just ignore it. The scoring will all work out if you follow the directions in number 2.)

Reading

  1. Chapter 35
  2. Here’s the audio link.  This is for Chapters 33, 34, and 35.
  3. Turn the page and read the conclusion.

Day 41

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your new words for the week. These are all the words for the week.

Writing

  1. Read about analyzing literature and writing literary analysis.
  2. Read over the requirements for your Novel Research Paper. (Your word processing program probably has a word count. Use that instead of 2-3 pages as the guideline. The length will depend on the font, the spacing…)
  3. The grading rubric is on that same page.  Read over it to understand what is expected.
  4. It is due on Day 45.
  5. You will not be submitting this for peer editing.

Day 42

Vocabulary

  1. Go to the flashcards and make sure you know the words.

Writing

  1. Work on your assignment.

Day 43

Vocabulary

  1. Make sure you know your words.

Writing

  1. Work on your assignment.

Day 44

Vocabulary

  1. Make sure you know your words.

Writing

  1. Work on your assignment.

Day 45

Vocabulary

  1. Choose test.
  2. Record your score.

Writing

  1. Finish your assignment.
  2. Grade your assignment based on the grading rubric.
  3. Record your score.

STOP

This is the end of the first quarter. It’s time to save some work in your portfolio. You should probably save all of your major written work: the literary analysis, the short story and the compare and contrast essay, and the poem too, if you like. At this point you can total up your scores from the first quarter (unless you are waiting on peer editing). Divide the total by the total possible and then multiply by 100 for your grade. (Just ignore decimals.) This is your first quarter grade. At the end of the year, we can add in points for completing the reading and daily assignments, but you should try for an A. Look at where you lost points and think about what you need to do to not lose them again.

Day 46(*)

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the first half of the words and definitions.

Writing(*)

  1. Here’s a verb review.
  2. More on verb tenses
  3. Try two exercises.
  4. (*)Print out your next grading sheet or use the Excel version.
  5. Take a quiz.
  6. It will tell you your percentage. Divide it by four and record your score out of 25.

Reading

  1. Read the drama terms.
  2. Complete the crossword puzzle on drama terms.

Day 47

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the rest of the words and definitions.

Writing

  1. Read about Aristotle’s Theory of Tragedy.
  2. Read about Aristotle’s Six Elements of Drama.
  3. Read about Aristotle’s The Poetics.

Reading

  1. Read summaries of the three plays in the trilogy and read about the trilogy.

Day 48

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play hangman.
  2. Look over your words.

Writing

  1. Read about the elements of drama.

Reading

  1. Read the discussions on Antigone.
  2. Read these quotes from the play with analysis to help you get “into” the language of the play.
  3. What sums up the meaning of the play? What book of the Bible does this remind you of? (hint: Asked earlier about something else reminding of this same book.) (answer: Ecclesiastes)

Day 49(*)

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Complete the word search.
  2. Look over your words.

Reading(*)

  1. (*)Print out this study guide for Antigone or type right on it. Fill it in as you reach each section.
  2. Here’s an audio version of the play if you are interested.
  3. Start with a summary of lines 1-116. I want to point out that the summaries are based on a different translation of the play. The story is still the same, so they are useful, but any quotes from the play won’t be exact quotes from what you are reading.
  4. Read part 1 of Antigone. Stop where you see the break indicated in the text.
  5. Read the next summary of lines 117-178.
  6. Read part 2 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. You are going to be doing a ten-minute writing time each day. Here is what you will be using.
  2. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. You can do this by hand or by typing (today).
  3. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.  If you type, 3/4 of a page = 250 words, 2/3 = 200 words, 1/2 = 150 words, 1/3 = 100 words.

Day 50

Vocabulary

  1. Take the practice quiz.
  2. Record your score.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 179-376.
  3. Read part 3 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 377-416.
  5. Read part 4 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. You can do this by hand or by typing (today).
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.  If you type, 3/4 of a page = 250 words, 2/3 = 200 words, 1/2 = 150 words, 1/3 = 100 words.

Day 51

Vocabulary

  1. Read your words for the week.
  2. Write them down if that helps you learn them.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 417-655.
  3. Read part 5 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 656-700.
  5. Read part 6 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. You can do this by hand or by typing (today).
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.  If you type, 3/4 of a page = 250 words, 2/3 = 200 words, 1/2 = 150 words, 1/3 = 100 words.

Day 52

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 701-878.
  3. Read part 7 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 879-894.
  5. Read part 8 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. You can do this by hand or by typing (today).
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.  If you type, 3/4 of a page = 250 words, 2/3 = 200 words, 1/2 = 150 words, 1/3 = 100 words.

Day 53

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 895-969.
  3. Read part 9 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 970-1034.
  5. Read part 10 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. You can do this by hand or by typing (today).
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.  If you type, 3/4 of a page = 250 words, 2/3 = 200 words, 1/2 = 150 words, 1/3 = 100 words.

Day 54

Vocabulary

  1. Learn your words.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 1035-1089.
  3. Read part 11 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 1090-1237.
  5. Read part 12 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. Today you must write by hand. You need to practice for in class written essays. They are on the SATs and will be part of many college courses.
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page.

Day 55

Vocabulary

  1. Take your vocabulary test.
  2. Record your score out of ten.

Reading

  1. Keep your study guide available and fill in the answers as you are able.
  2. Read the summary of lines 1238-1273.
  3. Read part 13 of Antigone.
  4. Read the summary of lines 1274 – 1470.
  5. Read part 14 of Antigone.

Writing

  1. Choose a topic. Start the timer. Write. Today you must write by hand. You need to practice for in class written essays. They are on the SATs and will be part of many college courses.
  2. Record your score out of five according to the rules at the top of the page. (These points will count as extra credit.)

Day 56

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the first half of the words and definitions for unit 6.

Reading

  1. Complete the character match up.
  2. Read this sample newspaper article.

Writing

  1. Answer the following questions in a well-written paragraph (8-10 sentences).Teiresias tells Creon, “The only crime is pride.”What does he mean by this? How can pride lead to faulty judgment? Can poor decisions be rectified? How? from GVL
  2. Record 1 point for each sentence up to 10. Subtract a point for anything missing: introductory sentence which explains the question, answers to any of the above questions.

Day 57

Vocabulary

  1. Use the flashcards to write down the rest of the words and definitions from unit 6.

Reading

  1. Read the newspaper for 15-20 minutes.

Writing

  1. Review what Aristotle said about tragedy and tragic heroes. Do you think there is a tragic hero in the story of Antigone? Who do you consider the tragic hero? Why? Support your claim with evidence and examples from the story. (Responses should be at least 6-9 sentences.) 

0 Replies to “Literature For Composition Essays Stories Poems”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *